Grants of up to £10,000 for projects that reduce crime are now available to not-for-profit groups across the city.

The Hull Crime Reduction Fund is open for applications until Friday 31 January.

The fund is administered by the Hull Community Safety Partnership with funding from the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner.

Tracy Harsley, chair of the Hull Community Safety Partnership, said

The partnership is committed to working with and supporting community groups to make Hull a safer place to live, work and visit.

Through the Crime Reduction Fund, we are able to provide funds to community group projects that will lead to improved outcomes for residents and communities, whether this is by supporting victims, diverting people from crime, building local resilience to criminality or by increasing awareness of choices which help keep people safe.

I would encourage anyone with an idea that supports improved safety of our residents, businesses and visitors to submit a bid and make a difference to the community.

Previously funding projects have included the No More Knives campaign across schools in Hull, supporting ex-offenders via a gardening project, CCTV for a community facility and funding of two British Sign Language professionals to make events accessible to hearing impaired and deaf people.

The Hull Homeless Community Project is one of the groups to receive funding.

Andrew Smith from the project said

Being awarded Crime Reduction Funding has meant over the past 12 months Hull Homeless has been able to directly impact the lives of 172 at risk and vulnerable women in Hull through our dedicated female drop in service.

This service exists specifically to support at risk women who often don’t fit the threshold or criteria for statutory or mainstream support. Working with women who are either escaping domestic abuse, exploitation or leaving the criminal justice system, our goal is to support these women into sustainable independent living in a constructive and manageable way to avoid further crisis, crime, exploitation or abuse.

Adrian Fisher of Rooted In Hull, another project to have benefited from the funding, said:

The fund allowed us to help with some of the most marginalised in Hull, giving them the chance to get involved with construction and practical work in growing veg and salad.

Applications must support the Police and Crime plan and Community Safety Partnership priorities to reduce domestic abuse and violent behaviour, reduce offending and re-offending and support victims, vulnerable people and communities.

Keith Hunter, Police and Crime Commissioner for Humberside, said:

One of the key aims of my police and crime plan is to deliver increasingly self-sustaining and safe communities. I have funded the Community Safety Partnership in Hull to ensure community groups have a local point of contact and I hope this latest round of funding will encourage a greater community involvement to tackle crime and safety.

Apply for the fund, or find more information here.